Passover, Nisan 10-13, 33 AD

Exodus 12:1-6 Now the Lord said to Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, “This month shall be the beginning of months for you; it is to be the first month of the year to you. Speak to all the congregation of Israel, saying, ‘On the tenth of this month they are each one to take a lamb for themselves, according to their fathers’ households, a lamb for each household. Now if the household is too small for a lamb, then he and his neighbor nearest to his house are to take one according to the number of persons in them; according to what each man should eat, you are to divide the lamb. Your lamb shall be an unblemished male a year old; you may take it from the sheep or from the goats. You shall keep it until the fourteenth day of the same month…

lamb

These directions were given to Moses by God roughly 1,500 years before the birth of Christ. The setting was Egypt prior to the Exodus. Moving forward, the Jewish people are to complete this ordinance every year on these dates.

The focus of this post is the correlation of the dates noted in Exodus 12 and the dates noted in the Passion Week of Christ.

On the tenth of this month they are each one to take a lamb for themselves… You shall keep it until the fourteenth day of the same month.

The directions to the Jewish people are straight forward. The first month of the religious year is Nisan. On Nisan 10, take a lamb and inspect it for four days. Make sure the lamb is unblemished. The time frame is Nisan 10, 11, 12, and 13.

Fast forward over 1,500 years, Jesus enters Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. The date is Sunday, Nisan 9, 33 AD. Jesus is the sacrificial lamb of the Passover.

We know Jesus entered Jerusalem on Palm Sunday from John 12:1 Jesus, therefore, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead. A Hebrew Calendar of 33 AD tells us Passover was on Friday, Nisan 14. Six days before Passover is Saturday or the Sabbath, Nisan 8. Scripture tells us Jesus is in Bethany on Saturday, Nisan 8. Bethany is east of Jerusalem approximately 1.5 miles. The Mount of Olives sits between Bethany and Jerusalem. He is visiting Mary, Martha, and Lazarus.

John 12:12 On the next day the large crowd who had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem… The next day is Sunday, Nisan 9. Jesus enters Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. Jesus only looked around the Temple on Nisan 9. He did not subject Himself to criticism or analysis from religious leaders by His actions on this day. Jesus did not enter Jerusalem for inspection on Palm Sunday. He left and went back to Bethany. Mark 11:11 Jesus entered Jerusalem and came into the temple; and after looking around at everything, He left for Bethany with the twelve, since it was already late. If Jesus had cleared the temple on Sunday, He would have been in the “pen” of Jerusalem for inspection five days instead of four days as indicated in Exodus 12. The law would not have been followed.

Mark 11:12 On the next day, when they had left Bethany, He became hungry. The next day is Monday, Nisan 10. From this point forward, Jesus was inspected for imperfections. Then He cleared the Temple. He was questioned and tested. He was examined and challenged by religious leaders, other Jews, and Greeks on Monday, Nisan 10 through Thursday, Nisan 13 for four days (March 29 – April 2, 33 AD on a Gregorian calendar). He was found to be without blemish or flaw.

http://www.torahcalendar.com/Calendar.asp?YM=Y33M1

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2 Responses to “Passover, Nisan 10-13, 33 AD”

  1. Deena Linquist Says:

    Good job, Paul. We, as Christians, need to educate ourselves
    about these parallels.

    Like

    • Deena: Thanks for reading and commenting. The parallels and the timing only get more intense and frequent during the Passion Week. Figurative language will become a literal truth within the context of the Mosaic Law. Another fun fact if you will. The calendar structure (Hebrew, Gregorian, solar eclipses, blood red moons, and stars, days of the week) observed during 33 AD is exactly the same in 2015. Please feel free to pass along to others.

      Like

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