Archive for prostituted individuals

Property Purchased for Christine’s Place

Posted in #PaulthePoke, Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , , on October 26, 2020 by paulthepoke

The following quotes are from Christine McDonald. She was recently interviewed in an article for http://northeastnews.net/

Local effort seeks to end prostitution ‘from all angles’ was written by Abby Hoover on October 23, 2020.

http://northeastnews.net/pages/local-effort-seeks-to-end-prostitution-from-all-angles

“I guess it’s multi-faceted, number one, the girls have a place to go consistently to take a shower, grab a sandwich. They have needs, their challenges that got them into the places where they’re at oftentimes have left them excluded and invisible, or dropped through the cracks of systems and institutions.”

“The reality is, if we didn’t have buyers, we wouldn’t have traffickers exploiting our most vulnerable.”

“We’ve been trying to arrest our way out of this, and that hasn’t worked. [The prostitutes] go in, they get arrested, they move them to another corner, and then we create insurmountable barriers by giving them a criminal record that when it is time to get out, nobody wants to rent to them, nobody wants to hire them, nobody.”

“I’d never had a job and when I tried to get some services when I was in my 30’s, people had told me that my arrest record was too long. I had felony convictions and my chances at success were too small because my barriers were too huge.”

“Even a sandwich comes at a cost, even something as simple as going to sleep in safety comes at a cost, or the privilege of having healthcare, being treated, comes at a cost, and whether that’s your body being exploited or whether that’s a monetary cost, the rest of the world doesn’t operate in that same way.”

“You can choose to come in here and you can choose to go back out, but hopefully every time you choose to come back in, you’re reassured that you are worth a pathway out.”

“If we could start shifting those conversations about, ‘We need to do something about these girls’ to, ‘We need to understand there are men driving from all over the state and across the state line, other counties, to pay for these girls. Some of these girls grew up in Northeast and now they’re being paid for by people who are not necessarily from the Northeast community.” -Christine McDonald

Christine McDonald is working with Relentless Pursuit Outreach and Recovery in Kansas City, MO. Their location is at the corner of Independence and Quincy Avenues.

https://www.rpor.org/our-story

Below are links and highlights to Kansas City’s Memorial to Sex Trafficked Individuals at Lykins Park.

https://www.kcur.org/arts-life/2020-10-22/first-memorial-to-survivors-of-sex-trafficking-to-be-unveiled-at-lykins-square-park-in-kansas-city

~

Contact Information:
Christine C. McDonald
636-487-8986
Christine.CryPurple@gmail.com

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Through The Eyes of Grace –Christine C McDonald 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEj5RbFpuzjx_CuksAqgyXA/featured

https://crypurplemovie.com/

Do Your Best… Christine McDonald

Posted in #PaulthePoke, Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , on October 27, 2019 by paulthepoke

From The Same Kind of Human, Seeing the Marginalized and Exploited through Eyes of Grace

God does not demand that every man attain to what is theoretically highest and best. It is better to be a good street sweeper than a bad writer, better to be a good bartender than a bad doctor, and the repentant thief who died with Jesus on Calvary was far more perfect than the holy ones who had Him nailed to the cross. And yet, abstractly speaking, what is more holy than the priesthood and less holy than the state of a criminal? The dying thief had, perhaps, disobeyed the will of God in many things: but in the most important event of his life he listened and obeyed. The Pharisees had kept the law to the letter and had spent their lives in the pursuit of a most scrupulous perfection. But they were so intent upon perfection as an abstraction that when God manifested His will and His perfection in a concrete and definite way they had no choice but to reject it. ―Thomas Merton, No Man Is an Island

Christine McDonald was recently featured on Fox 4 News. See the link below for the written article and video report.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

https://crypurplemovie.com/

A Merry Christmas on the Street

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , , on December 14, 2018 by paulthepoke

Christine works for legislative change in Missouri metropolitans.

Caution, adult content.

It was Christmas morning in the late ’90s. I had showered on Christmas Eve, at a house that had no electricity and no heat, but had running water. I had grabbed a fresh change of clothes at the local thrift store on Truman Road in Kansas City. I changed outside in the parking lot between the dumpsters, tossing the dirty clothes I had worn for the last four, maybe five, days.

There were always folks willing to buy sex on Christmas. Men “treating themselves to a Christmas gift.” Men thinking that if they buy sex on Christmas they are giving a “gift” to the prostituted. Such men dared not divulge their perversities to those they were in a relationship with or married to. Instead, they “gifted” their twisted sexual desires or fetishes as a selfish gift to themselves and supposedly a generous gift to their prostitute of choice. They paid a prostitute on Christmas to indulge their perversion.

I saw the bright red car heading my way. I made it to the corner and turned to walk up the block when he turned again. As I approached the street that ran behind Apple Market, he sat there waiting in his shiny sports car. He backed up slowly, rolled down the passenger window and smiled. “Get in,” he said.

As I stepped into the car, he reached his arm toward the back seat. I paused hesitantly with the car door still open, watching intently to see what he was reaching for before getting completely in the car. He pulled out a single rose. I closed the door as he handed it to me. I looked at him and back at the rose and said, “Thanks.” We drove off.

He asked if I was hungry, and I said, “Yes.” He said, “Let’s get you some food first, okay?” I said, “Sure.” We drove to a few places close by, but they were closed.

I smelled the rose and touched the petals. They were soft and beautiful against the stark winter landscape. Looking at the rose, he said, “The 7–11 where I got that is open. Shall we just go there to get you some food?” I agreed. I made nachos, piling on as much chili and cheese as the paper container would hold. I grabbed a bottle of OJ and a lighter and met him at the counter.

He asked if I needed cigarettes, and I said, “No, I don’t smoke.” He glanced at the lighter I was sliding in my jeans pocket, but he did not probe further and I did not offer an explanation of my addiction. We got back in the car and I thanked him. He encouraged me to go ahead and eat. He continued driving around the area where he had picked me up.

Then he said, “I saw you out last night. You’ve changed clothes since then, and you look nice.” I thanked him while thinking to myself, small talk? Really? But at least he was kind. As I finished up my food, I thanked him for letting me eat first.

“Okay, now let’s talk business,” I said. He reached into his shirt pocket and handed me a crisp $100 bill. He said, “We’re both alone on Christmas, but I have a home to go to, a warm place.” He nodded toward the hundred dollar bill in my hand. “That’s yours. Can I give you a lift to a hotel so you can have a warm place?”

The curious driver spoke again. “Well, why don’t you tell me where you would like me to drop you off so you won’t have to walk any more than you have to? It’s the least I can do. It’s a holiday, and all. I know it’s not much, but I really don’t want to take you to a dope house or anything like that, if you don’t mind.”

That’s when I realized he was giving me the money expecting nothing in return. Perplexed, I asked, “So you’re just giving me a hundred bucks and going about your business?” He smiled at me and said, “Yes, I am.” I clarified, “You don’t want anything. For real?” He said, “No I don’t. I guess you don’t get that much, huh?”

I just sat there trying to process it and finally answered, “No. No I do not.”

On this day, however, this prostituted woman would not have to have a man put his hands on her. This moment was like a miracle: no one touching me, no one pawing me.

A day of, what felt to me at that moment, freedom. A state of being that rarely found its place on my journey of life. On that blustery winter day, that gift of freedom, the connection to me as a human and not an object, was the best Christmas gift I had ever received, maybe in my entire lifetime.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

https://www.amazon.com/Same-Kind-Human-Marginalized-Exploited/dp/154080044X

https://www.amazon.com/Cry-Purple-Christine-McDonald/dp/1482053616

The Bias Master

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , on October 12, 2018 by paulthepoke

Revelation 18:11, 13b And the merchants of the earth weep and mourn for her, since no one buys their cargo anymore…  and slaves, that is, human souls.

Christine McDonald

Featuring Christine Clarity McDonald

Filming for Christine’s autobiographical movie “Cry Purple” started this month, October 2018. Coming soon to a theater near you.

Prostituted individuals are not only bound by their exploiters, their possible addictions, and the purchasers (those willing to objectify them for their own sexual desires); they are also bound by the biases and judgments that we hold over them.

A human being pays for the possession of another’s body—maybe for moments or for hours. A living, breathing person with a history, a family, a story, feelings, and thoughts is purchased and ruled over, objectified, and commodified. The purchaser knows that their money brings the power to get what they want. It’s a sick issue of
dominating control, as I see it.

sex slaves

But is that how we are used to thinking of it? Stop for a moment and evaluate your own reaction. What comes to mind when you hear the word prostitute? Are the terms that pop into your mind filled with love, grace, and genuine sorrow? Or are they filled with judgment, disdain, and a “got–what–he/she–deserved” mentality? Do you picture the victim of unspeakable injustice, or do you picture a criminal?

Read more at…

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