Archive for the Christine “Clarity” McDonald Category

A Merry Christmas on the Street

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , , on December 14, 2018 by paulthepoke

Christine works for legislative change in Missouri metropolitans.

Caution, adult content.

It was Christmas morning in the late ’90s. I had showered on Christmas Eve, at a house that had no electricity and no heat, but had running water. I had grabbed a fresh change of clothes at the local thrift store on Truman Road in Kansas City. I changed outside in the parking lot between the dumpsters, tossing the dirty clothes I had worn for the last four, maybe five, days.

There were always folks willing to buy sex on Christmas. Men “treating themselves to a Christmas gift.” Men thinking that if they buy sex on Christmas they are giving a “gift” to the prostituted. Such men dared not divulge their perversities to those they were in a relationship with or married to. Instead, they “gifted” their twisted sexual desires or fetishes as a selfish gift to themselves and supposedly a generous gift to their prostitute of choice. They paid a prostitute on Christmas to indulge their perversion.

I saw the bright red car heading my way. I made it to the corner and turned to walk up the block when he turned again. As I approached the street that ran behind Apple Market, he sat there waiting in his shiny sports car. He backed up slowly, rolled down the passenger window and smiled. “Get in,” he said.

As I stepped into the car, he reached his arm toward the back seat. I paused hesitantly with the car door still open, watching intently to see what he was reaching for before getting completely in the car. He pulled out a single rose. I closed the door as he handed it to me. I looked at him and back at the rose and said, “Thanks.” We drove off.

He asked if I was hungry, and I said, “Yes.” He said, “Let’s get you some food first, okay?” I said, “Sure.” We drove to a few places close by, but they were closed.

I smelled the rose and touched the petals. They were soft and beautiful against the stark winter landscape. Looking at the rose, he said, “The 7–11 where I got that is open. Shall we just go there to get you some food?” I agreed. I made nachos, piling on as much chili and cheese as the paper container would hold. I grabbed a bottle of OJ and a lighter and met him at the counter.

He asked if I needed cigarettes, and I said, “No, I don’t smoke.” He glanced at the lighter I was sliding in my jeans pocket, but he did not probe further and I did not offer an explanation of my addiction. We got back in the car and I thanked him. He encouraged me to go ahead and eat. He continued driving around the area where he had picked me up.

Then he said, “I saw you out last night. You’ve changed clothes since then, and you look nice.” I thanked him while thinking to myself, small talk? Really? But at least he was kind. As I finished up my food, I thanked him for letting me eat first.

“Okay, now let’s talk business,” I said. He reached into his shirt pocket and handed me a crisp $100 bill. He said, “We’re both alone on Christmas, but I have a home to go to, a warm place.” He nodded toward the hundred dollar bill in my hand. “That’s yours. Can I give you a lift to a hotel so you can have a warm place?”

The curious driver spoke again. “Well, why don’t you tell me where you would like me to drop you off so you won’t have to walk any more than you have to? It’s the least I can do. It’s a holiday, and all. I know it’s not much, but I really don’t want to take you to a dope house or anything like that, if you don’t mind.”

That’s when I realized he was giving me the money expecting nothing in return. Perplexed, I asked, “So you’re just giving me a hundred bucks and going about your business?” He smiled at me and said, “Yes, I am.” I clarified, “You don’t want anything. For real?” He said, “No I don’t. I guess you don’t get that much, huh?”

I just sat there trying to process it and finally answered, “No. No I do not.”

On this day, however, this prostituted woman would not have to have a man put his hands on her. This moment was like a miracle: no one touching me, no one pawing me.

A day of, what felt to me at that moment, freedom. A state of being that rarely found its place on my journey of life. On that blustery winter day, that gift of freedom, the connection to me as a human and not an object, was the best Christmas gift I had ever received, maybe in my entire lifetime.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

https://www.amazon.com/Same-Kind-Human-Marginalized-Exploited/dp/154080044X

https://www.amazon.com/Cry-Purple-Christine-McDonald/dp/1482053616

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We All Wear Masks… Christine McDonald

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , on December 9, 2018 by paulthepoke

MasqueradeWe all wear masks, a façade we can control and manage that tells the world who we are—or at least who we want them to think we are. Yet deep down, our greatest longing is to be known for who we truly are. We want to be seen and accepted for who we are, unfiltered.

As children, we show our true selves with unadulterated abandon. We are full of life, hope, dreams, and open arms. We imagine ourselves as fighter pilots, princesses, doctors, lawyers, nurses, astronauts, or anything else our imaginations can dream up. As we grow older, experiences teach us to show people only the parts of us they can’t hurt, even if they try. Life and growing cynicism stamp out the sky–high dreams we once held. No child says, “I want to be a prostitute, homeless, raped, or addicted when I grow up.”

The most special moments, though, are when we meet someone who truly sees us in spite of our efforts to put up an impenetrable wall. As scary as those moments are, they are the most freeing, too. To have another person validate our uniqueness among humanity breathes value all over our soul. It is as if, in that moment, our Creator whispers through that person, saying, “I still see you and I know you. No matter where you are, you are mine and you are loved.” When David wrote, “I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well” (Psalm 139:14, NIV), he took a moment to see himself as God sees him. He recognized that he was a marvelous creation of a marvelous God.

Christine McDonald

Each person you come into contact with is a marvelous creation of a marvelous God. He or she is dearly and deeply loved by a God who knows us each intimately, even down to the numbers of hairs on our head.

Luke 12:7 Indeed, the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Do not fear; you are more valuable than many sparrows.

Take a moment today to “see” someone. Loving others is that simple.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

 

Read more at…

Christine McDonald & Bishop Michael Curry

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , on November 22, 2018 by paulthepoke

The Right Reverend Michael Curry, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, interviews Christine McDonald, author of Cry Purple (crypurple.com) and an advocate for survivors of sex trafficking, about what we can do to combat trafficking.

Filming for Christine’s autobiographical movie “Cry Purple” started October 2018. Coming soon to a theater near you.

Matthew 1:5-6, 16 and Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of David the king… of whom Jesus was born, who is called Christ.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

https://www.amazon.com/Cry-Purple-Christine-McDonald/dp/1482053616

Precious in HIS Sight

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , , , , , on November 16, 2018 by paulthepoke

Christine McDonaldChristine has assisted in writing Federal legislation for block grant dollars to states for Substance Abuse.

Our culture ascribes value to people based on a million things that are never listed or mentioned in the Bible as qualifiers for God’s grace and love. We can have compassion for all of the hurting we encounter. I pray that we are challenged to look, not at the behaviors of the moment, but at the people beneath. I hope we dig a little deeper and begin to fight for people.

Instead of passing judgment on the spot, what if we simply asked, “How did this individual get here, right here at this moment in time?” Then we could ask, “God, what would you have me see and do for this individual, right here at this moment in time?”

To be like Christ, we must look beyond the shell; then we will see a hurting individual and not just a label. Labeling can be just as damning as the objectification practiced by the buyers of sex. Let me reiterate: We are as guilty of objectification and commodifying people as the buyers of sex are when we accept and view people according to labels: “prostitute”, “addict”, “disturbed”, “criminal”, etc. I could continue the list, but I think you get the picture here.

homeless eyes

We must look past the classification to the created person. God knows each one of us so well that He knows the numbers of hairs on our head (Matthew 10:30), so don’t you think He probably knows that guy on the street by name and not as “the addict?”

How do we look beyond the shell? How do we see beneath the surface of those we have a heart for? We have to be intentional, asking God to reveal this to us. We have to be humbled and willing to be uncomfortable.

What can we do? How can we change this? We have to get educated! We have to ask the right questions! And we, as a community, have to shift our views from criminal to hurting individuals for these populations!

Let’s hope eyes will be opened to see these individuals through new eyes, so that together we can make a real difference.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

Recovering Compassion

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , , , , , on November 2, 2018 by paulthepoke

Psalm 25:6 Remember, O LORD, Your compassion and Your lovingkindnesses, for they have been from of old.

Psalm 145:9 The LORD is good to all, and His mercies are over all His works.

Daniel 9:9 To the Lord our God belong compassion and forgiveness, for we have rebelled against Him…

 

“I have been a part of fighting demand since 2007,” Christine Clarity McDonald.

See Christine in this featured story by Fox 4 News in Kansas City, MO. Video provided in the story that aired on television.

https://fox4kc.com/2018/10/29/kansas-leaders-join-growing-number-of-states-working-to-go-after-sex-buyers/

Christine McDonald

Our compassion should be guided by God’s compassion, not dependent on age or gender or how a person got in their situation in the first place. After all, when we engage with these individuals who are over 18 and learn how they entered the world of commercial sexual exploitation, we find that more often than not their victimization began as a child. Why then do we have such a hard time viewing adults as victims and worthy of our love when they are recovered or reach out for services?

It is because we, the outsiders, looking in with our judgments and our continued labels, have built these barriers. These barriers, coupled with the existing internal challenges these individuals face, stand in the way of their chance to soar and flourish into the creatures that our Creator has designed them to be.

compassion

I could go on here, but the point is simple: The hurt caused by trauma is the very same to the prostituted individual as it is to the homeless person, or to the individual suffering from mental illness, or the college student, or the elderly lady down the street, or the professional, or the fellow church members. We must recover compassion.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

The Age Stigma

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on October 26, 2018 by paulthepoke

Psalm 116:5 Gracious is the LORD, and righteous; our God is merciful.

Psalm 86:15 But You, O Lord, are a compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in loving devotion and truth.

Featuring Christine Clarity McDonald

Christine McDonald

Finally, let’s touch on the way age factors into people’s categorizations of “worthy versus unworthy victims.” They say the average prostituted person’s life span in the life of prostitution is seven years. If they make it the full seven years, they often end up dead from drug overdose, suicide, or murder. Only a small percent of these individuals will find a way out.

It is also said that the average age of entry into prostitution is around 13. Think about it. If a 13–year–old becomes a prostituted individual and survives seven years, they would only be 20 years old. We, as a society, see a youth in this awful life as a victim, but once they make it to 18, we expect them to somehow break the mental, emotional, and traumatic chains of prostitution and walk away. Once an individual crosses the invisible line of “adulthood,” we no longer view them as victims but as criminals. All compassion or awareness of the horrors they endure seems to disappear at that magical age of 18. Yet it is so much more complicated than that.

child abuse

As I see it, the longer they are in it, the more trauma they have endured and the deeper the hurt. Yet because they didn’t recover at age 15, we say “screw them” when they are 19, or 22, or 36, or older and trying to find a way out. That is not okay. Think about it: Does God place an age limit on His grace in our lives? No, He does not. However, this is not how the majority of our society sees it.

Why is that? Who are we, as a society, as people of faith, and as service providers to determine what age someone is recoverable to begin their healing process? If God sustained them three days, three years, or 33 years in a horrific life of commercial sexual exploitation, then perhaps we should embrace God’s love for them and reflect that love as His children to His children.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

The Worthy Versus the Unworthy

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , , , , on October 19, 2018 by paulthepoke

Ezekiel 7:23 Forge a chain! For the land is full of bloody crimes and the city is full of violence.

Christine McDonald

Featuring Christine Clarity McDonald

See a Wall Street Journal article featuring Christine McDonald.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/more-states-allow-ex-drug-offenders-to-get-benefits-1443570818

Sadly, our society has fostered a culture that assigns people varying levels of worth. It’s a worthy versus the unworthy environment. To the mainstream public, the rape of a prostituted person isn’t recognized as rape in the same way that the rape of a working, middle−class woman in the parking garage after work inarguably is.

worthy

Prostitutes are expendable even to murderers. Who looks for missing prostitutes? A prostituted person is 59 percent more likely to be murdered while working than one in any other profession. The murder of a prostitute doesn’t reap the same passionate response as the murder of a college student, a business professional, or virtually any other human being.

The truth is, regardless of whether you are a man, woman, boy, or girl, violence is violence, trauma is trauma, and hurt is hurt, and the taking of any life is murder. Yet the world in general puts blinders on where prostituted people are concerned.

They are viewed as nameless, faceless background characters. No one cares for them on the most basic of levels, so why would they be so much as a blink of a thought when the conversation turns to the abused, violated, and hurt?

Ignorance abounds. No one says a word when someone says, “If they weren’t living that lifestyle, that wouldn’t have happened.” Or, “If she hadn’t been an addict trading her body for drugs, she wouldn’t have been beaten by that guy.”

But the “she” in those statements is a real and precious individual. She was once someone’s baby. She was conceived in the mind of God before she ever walked this earth. She’s no more lost than the rest of humanity before they come to know Christ, and yet even Christians don’t give her a second thought—or even a first. It’s almost as if she’s not really human. In jails, in prisons, in treatment, with law enforcement, with churches, and any and all other circles, the prostituted person is viewed with judgment, treated with harsh words, and condemned. People in general don’t even try to hide their disgust. The lowest of the lowest, even to criminals. How does one recover from such an existence?

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

Read more at…

PaulthePoke

Prophecy Watch & Bible Study

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