Archive for isaiah 53

Trend Update: Isaiah 53

Posted in Gospel, Isaiah, Prophecy, Trend Update with tags , , , on May 13, 2016 by paulthepoke

 

Unleavened Bread: Matzah

Posted in Gospel, Prophecy, Spring Feasts with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2016 by paulthepoke

The second of God’s holidays is Unleavened Bread or Chag haMatazt in the Hebrew. The holiday begins on the 15th of Nisan and runs for seven days.

The directions for Unleavened Bread are noted in Exodus 12:18-20. In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at evening, you shall eat unleavened bread, until the twenty-first day of the month at evening. Seven days there shall be no leaven found in your houses; for whoever eats what is leavened, that person shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he is an alien or a native of the land. You shall not eat anything leavened; in all your dwellings you shall eat unleavened bread.

The focus of the week is to live a life without leaven, the symbol for sin. Leaven is not to be in the house. Leaven products are not to be consumed. Bread without yeast, matzah, is to be eaten.

What does the matzah look like? In the most fundamental Judaism homes, matzah is an irregular, round shaped piece of bread. It resembles a cracker or wafer in thickness. There are even rows of tiny holes on the wafer bread. The cracker-like bread appears to be striped.

Isaiah 53:5 But He was pierced through for our transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; the chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His scourging we are healed.

1 Peter 2:24 and He Himself bore our sins in His body on the cross, so that we might die to sin and live to righteousness; for by His wounds you were healed. Peter is quoting Isaiah 53.

Jesus is the unleavened bread. He is the bread of life. John 6:35 Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; he who comes to Me will not hunger, and he who believes in Me will never thirst.  

John 6:48 I am the bread of life.

John 6:50-51 This is the bread which comes down out of heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. I am the living bread that came down out of heaven; if anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread also which I will give for the life of the world is My flesh.

Isaiah 6:6-7 Mercy, Grace, Forgiveness, the Old Testament

Posted in Isaiah with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2012 by paulthepoke

Isaiah 6:6-7 Then one of the seraphim flew to me with a burning coal in his hand, which he had taken from the altar with tongs. He touched my mouth with it and said, “Behold, this has touched your lips; and your iniquity is taken away and your sin is forgiven.” 

The events above are taking place in the presence of God in the throne room of Heaven. The concept of burning coal from the altar in front of God in Heaven is consistent with the Aaronic ordinances given in Leviticus 16:12 “He shall take a firepan full of coals of fire from upon the altar before the LORD and two handfuls of finely ground sweet incense, and bring it inside the veil. What is done on earth is a picture of Heaven. This brings meaning to the phrase, “Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven”.

your iniquity is taken away… The Hebrew word for iniquity is ‘avon. As defined by Strong’s Concordance it means: perversity, depravity, iniquity, guilt or punishment/consequence of iniquity.

Burning coal is a symbol of cleansing. Fire purifies. Sin is taken away and removed in the presence of God. This is the Old Testament. Critics have often stated that removal and forgiveness of sin are New Testament ideas. Critics will say the God of the Old Testament is a mean ogre who is cruel and punishing, ready to crush with His thumb. There are many examples of mercy, grace, and forgiveness of sin in the Old Testament. These are Biblical concepts from beginning to end.

Psalm 32:1-2 How blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered! How blessed is the man to whom the LORD does not impute iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no deceit! These verses were written by David. He is clearly a man who had committed a transgression or two (murder, lust, adultery) in the events surrounding Bathsheba. He understood that God was merciful and gracious when it came to sin. In Psalm 32:5, David confessed his sins, and then You forgave my sins.

Psalm 51 is written with David’s adultery being at the forefront and focus of the Psalm. David knows he is guilty and he has sinned against God. David is in despair and desperate. Verse 1 Be gracious to me, O God, according to Your lovingkindness; according to the greatness of Your compassion blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin.  He also knows God can take care of his short comings. Verse 7,9 Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Hide Your face from my sins and blot out all my iniquities. There is plea bargaining and begging. David is playing “Let’s Make a Deal”. Verse 14 Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, the God of my salvation…

Critics will argue Isaiah was written after Jesus’ death and resurrection to fit and fulfill prophecy and doctrine. Unfortunately for the critic, Isaiah was copied in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the Septuagint, approximately 330 years before the birth of Christ (Israel My Glory, November/December 2012, p. 8). Isaiah 53 foreshadows Jesus’ work on the cross. Verse 5-6, 11b, 12b But He was pierced through for our transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; the chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His scourging we are healed. All of us like sheep have gone astray, each of us has turned to his own way; but the LORD has caused the iniquity of us all to fall on Him. By His knowledge the Righteous One, My Servant, will justify the many, as He will bear their iniquities. Because He poured out Himself to death, and was numbered with the transgressors; yet He Himself bore the sin of many, and interceded for the transgressors.

God has always been and will always be merciful, gracious, and forgiving.

Isaiah 1:5-6 Picture of Sin

Posted in Isaiah with tags , , , , , on September 17, 2010 by paulthepoke

Isaiah 1:5-6 Why will you be stricken any more? Will you continue the revolt? The whole head is sick, and the whole heart is faint. From the sole of the foot even to the head, no soundness is in it; only a wound and a strip and a fresh blow; they have not been closed, nor bound up; nor was it softened with oil.

Verse 5:God asks a rhetorical question. Why are you obsessed with sin? Why do you add to your lifestyle of sin? It is not enough to just sin a little and be content. You guys just keep adding and piling. The human condition is never satisfied and it has to have more and more. For example, the alcoholic can never just have one drink. We all have our shortcomings.

Here is the idea in the Hebrew language. The reference to the whole head and heart is to the chronic condition of the body. The result of sin is a sick body. It is a massive wound!

Verse 6: This condition is from head to toe. The sickness is complete. There is not one healthy part of the body. These are wounds that can not be healed. Welts and bruises have not been treated. The reference to oil is olive oil. Back in Isaiah’s time, olive oil was used for medicinal purposes. The injury is exposed and there are no bandages or medication. This body is just lying there and has not been sent to the emergency room for treatment. This is just a nasty, bloody mess.

That is what God thinks of sin. Who BECAME sin for us? Jesus.

2 Corinthians 5:21 He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.

He is the Father and Him is the Son. The Son was sinless. The Son took our place on our behalf. That is communicated in the original Greek text with the preposition “huper”.

Jesus physically bore the brunt of sin on his body from head to toe. Jesus was blindfolded and beaten (Luke 22:64). He was scourged (Mark 15:15). People spit on Jesus (Mark 14:65). They hit Him in the head repeatedly with a reed (Mark 15:19). His head adorned a crown of thorns (Matthew 27:29). He had nails driven into his feet and hands (Matthew 27:35). His body was pierced with a spear (John 19:34).

The idea of a sacrificial death for sin is noted in both the Old and New Testament. Here are two of many references that communicate this point.

Isaiah 53:5 But He was pierced through for our transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; the chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, And by His scourging we are healed.

1 Corinthians 15:3 For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received, that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures …

So one man died for the sins of the world? When you read that, what do you do with that? Do you believe it? If you do, God says you have eternal life. If you believe that to be true, how do you respond to that in your personal life from day-to-day? What is your attitude toward Jesus?

 

 

PaulthePoke

Prophecy Watch & Bible Study

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