Archive for forgiveness of sin

Honest Scales, Part 1… Rodna Epley

Posted in #PaulthePoke, Rodna Epley with tags , , , , , , on November 10, 2020 by paulthepoke

Using “honest scales” as Jesus always did will bring an end to any suffering and transform it into light, meaning the good thing that is desired will manifest.

Just before Jesus healed the paralytic man, He told him, “Son, your sins are forgiven you.” Everyone knew the intent for letting down the paralyzed man through the roof to where Jesus was preaching. It was for physical healing, so that the paralyzed man could walk. Yet the first thing Jesus said to the man after He saw their faith was that the man’s sins were forgiven.

The scribes who were sitting near Jesus began reasoning amongst themselves saying, “Why does this Man speak blasphemies like this? Who can forgive sins but God alone?”

Jesus knew that what He said would provoke the scribes. In fact, He was setting everyone up to receive the revelation of who He is and what He could do for them. Those who did not have “ears to hear” would by consequence be further blinded. When light enters a room, it exposes everything. That which is exposed will become light unless it chooses to run into the shadows with the darkness. Jesus was about to prove the Father was working through Him and gave Him the authority on earth to forgive sins.

So Jesus pulls out the “honest scales”. When we weigh something, we know its value. If we place oranges on the scale at the grocery store we can estimate its value by its weight and then we can purchase it if we have enough money. The same is true for spiritual things. If we don’t know what something weighs, then we place it on God’s honest scales and we know if we have enough faith to purchase it, so to speak. This is what Jesus did during the scene with the paralyzed man and the scribes.

Jesus said to the paralytic, “Which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven you,’ or to say, ‘Arise, take up your bed and walk’?” (vs 9). The obvious answer is that it’s easier to say “Your sins are forgiven you” because you don’t have to prove that. In fact, you can’t prove that unless you can weigh it somehow.

Forgiveness is invisible and can’t be physically proven except to the person who is forgiven. He has a peace radiating within him and all around him instantly upon being forgiven. The weight of unforgiveness, which can be felt, is lifted off of him. There is also proof of forgiveness in the way that life begins to transform, but physically proving someone has been forgiven is perhaps impossible. Unless forgiveness can be measured.

Jesus does measure it by answering His own question. It’s easier to say “Your sins are forgiven” since it can’t be easily proven. So Jesus says what is more difficult to say, which must be proven, “Rise up, take up your bed and walk.”

Since only God can make someone rise up and walk when they are paralyzed, when the man rose up and walked in front of all who were in the room, the revelation that Jesus could also forgive sins dropped into the minds of those who chose to remain in the light, those who had ears to hear God. For those who were hard-pressed against Jesus from the start, they remained blind and the revelation did not drop in.

Cry Purple

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 22, 2018 by paulthepoke

Ephesians 2:8-9 For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.

Romans 11:6 But if it is by grace, it is no longer on the basis of works; otherwise grace would no longer be grace.

 

Featuring Christine “Clarity” McDonald

cry purple

Cry Purple, by Christine McDonald, is the story of the author’s long journey from nearly two decades of homelessness, street-corner prostitution, crack addiction, and many stints in jail to her present life of total blindness, motherhood, and happiness.

The first two-thirds of the book tell the grim story of her youthful unhappiness, how and when she got into prostitution and drug addiction, the horrendous levels of violence that she and some of her fellow prostitutes suffered, and how the drugs eventually reduced her to an almost animal-like state. It was only when she hit rock bottom that she finally found the will to seek help and change her ways.

However, after getting clean and then engaged, she had numerous other difficulties and sorrows ahead of her: losing her sight due to a disease and having both her eyeballs removed, having a special-needs daughter that she had to give up for adoption due to her inability to care for her, and  watching her relationship with her children’s father dissolve.

Christine McDonaldShe currently lives in the St. Louis, Missouri area with her young son, Ricky. She practices an open adoption relationship with her daughter’s adoptive parents. She loves doing motivational speaking, and she does all she can to help and to advocate for ex offenders, addicts, and prostituted and trafficked women.  One of her largest passions is educating people out side of these circumstances to help them have a better understanding of the barriers society has placed before these under served populations to put their lives back together.

Filming for “Cry Purple” the movie is set to begin in October 2018. Interviews and writing are currently being completed. Release of the movie is tentatively set for sometime in 2019.

“Love your neighbor… ALL of ’em!” -Christine “Clarity” McDonald

 

To contact Christine directly send a E mail to:

Christine.crypurple@gmail.com

http://www.crypurple.com/

To purchase at Amazon.com, click on link below.

 

Our Daily Bread…Featuring Paul Beverly

Posted in Our Daily Bread with tags , , , , on August 17, 2017 by paulthepoke

pb bread

John 8:7 And as they continued to ask him, He stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.”

Look at him over there, he drinks every day. We don’t want him around us or in our church. He is a sinner. Look at him, I heard he’s smoked weed. We need to stay away from him, he’s a sinner. See that guy? He’s been to jail. I don’t know why, but he’s obviously a sinner & breaks the law. And look at that one, he’s divorced & I’m sure he must not have been a good husband. Stay clear of him, for sure a sinner. Is that guy a sinner? Yep, and so are you for judging him. No sin is greater or less than another & only one person has the right to judge us. Am I a sinner? Yep. I sin every day & was that guy that I just described at different points in my life. Does everyone know my story? Nope. We all sin every day. Nobody is perfect. Instead of judging others & thinking we are better, let’s pray for each other instead…

Have an accepting weekend my friends!!!

Sabbatical Year/Shemitah, Part 3

Posted in Gospel, Prophecy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2014 by paulthepoke

Deuteronomy 15:1-2 At the end of every seven years you shall grant a remission of debts. This is the manner of remission: every creditor shall release what he has loaned to his neighbor; he shall not exact it of his neighbor and his brother, because the LORD’S remission has been proclaimed.

In today’s world, the verses above are radical financial and economic concepts. All debt, regardless of size, is forgiven at the end of every seventh year. Imagine, a clean financial slate.

Think about how these verses would influence lending and borrowing practices. Larger loans would occur early in the seven year cycle. Debt structure would not look like it does today. The 30 year mortgage would be toast. Loans would likely be much smaller. Personal savings would be promoted. People would be more inclined to live within their means.

Think of all the debt practices: home mortgages, car loans, student loans, and credit cards just to mention a few. Debt is oppressive and restrictive to freedom. Consider how each of the above would be financed or paid if debt was forgiven at the end of every seven years. Consider the change in personal spending habits.

Creditors would be more careful how they loaned their money. There would be less loaning of money. Creditors would likely make less irresponsible loans to customers who do not have the means to pay. If implemented today, debt bubbles would be a thing of the past. At the end of every seven years, everyone would be debt free. If debt payments remained at the end of the cycle, it would be forgiven. Poverty would likely be diminished significantly.

Responsibility would be increased on both the lender and the borrower. These practices would significantly cut into corporate banking profits and affect their stock prices.

Deuteronomy 23:19-20 You shall not charge interest to your countrymen: interest on money, food, or anything that may be loaned at interest. You may charge interest to a foreigner, but to your countrymen you shall not charge interest, so that the LORD your God may bless you in all that you undertake in the land which you are about to enter to possess.

Interest free lending would promote national unity and good will toward your fellow countryman. It is a matter of looking after your neighbor and brother. Financial collaboration would be an outcome. People would be more interested in the success of others.

God does not want us to take financial advantage of our fellow man. These loaning practices were built into society by God. He understands the capacity of greed demonstrated by humanity. Don’t shaft your neighbor.

These financial concepts are nowhere to be seen in today’s economic world. Most people are not aware these statutes exist. Would our lives be economically easier if this were in place today? What a concept, it is a universal blessing from God if one loans interest free to their countryman.

The ultimate example of God’s release or remission is in His Son. Jesus forgives us of our debt, sin. John 1:29 The next day he saw Jesus coming to him and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world! Our transgressions are forgiven as a matter of grace and mercy. Ephesians 1:7 In Him we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of His grace. He has paid our debt without charging us. Romans 6:23 For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. It is His payment that allows us to possess eternity in New Jerusalem (Revelation 21).

Isaiah 6:6-7 Mercy, Grace, Forgiveness, the Old Testament

Posted in Isaiah with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 25, 2012 by paulthepoke

Isaiah 6:6-7 Then one of the seraphim flew to me with a burning coal in his hand, which he had taken from the altar with tongs. He touched my mouth with it and said, “Behold, this has touched your lips; and your iniquity is taken away and your sin is forgiven.” 

The events above are taking place in the presence of God in the throne room of Heaven. The concept of burning coal from the altar in front of God in Heaven is consistent with the Aaronic ordinances given in Leviticus 16:12 “He shall take a firepan full of coals of fire from upon the altar before the LORD and two handfuls of finely ground sweet incense, and bring it inside the veil. What is done on earth is a picture of Heaven. This brings meaning to the phrase, “Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven”.

your iniquity is taken away… The Hebrew word for iniquity is ‘avon. As defined by Strong’s Concordance it means: perversity, depravity, iniquity, guilt or punishment/consequence of iniquity.

Burning coal is a symbol of cleansing. Fire purifies. Sin is taken away and removed in the presence of God. This is the Old Testament. Critics have often stated that removal and forgiveness of sin are New Testament ideas. Critics will say the God of the Old Testament is a mean ogre who is cruel and punishing, ready to crush with His thumb. There are many examples of mercy, grace, and forgiveness of sin in the Old Testament. These are Biblical concepts from beginning to end.

Psalm 32:1-2 How blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered! How blessed is the man to whom the LORD does not impute iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no deceit! These verses were written by David. He is clearly a man who had committed a transgression or two (murder, lust, adultery) in the events surrounding Bathsheba. He understood that God was merciful and gracious when it came to sin. In Psalm 32:5, David confessed his sins, and then You forgave my sins.

Psalm 51 is written with David’s adultery being at the forefront and focus of the Psalm. David knows he is guilty and he has sinned against God. David is in despair and desperate. Verse 1 Be gracious to me, O God, according to Your lovingkindness; according to the greatness of Your compassion blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin.  He also knows God can take care of his short comings. Verse 7,9 Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Hide Your face from my sins and blot out all my iniquities. There is plea bargaining and begging. David is playing “Let’s Make a Deal”. Verse 14 Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, the God of my salvation…

Critics will argue Isaiah was written after Jesus’ death and resurrection to fit and fulfill prophecy and doctrine. Unfortunately for the critic, Isaiah was copied in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the Septuagint, approximately 330 years before the birth of Christ (Israel My Glory, November/December 2012, p. 8). Isaiah 53 foreshadows Jesus’ work on the cross. Verse 5-6, 11b, 12b But He was pierced through for our transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; the chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His scourging we are healed. All of us like sheep have gone astray, each of us has turned to his own way; but the LORD has caused the iniquity of us all to fall on Him. By His knowledge the Righteous One, My Servant, will justify the many, as He will bear their iniquities. Because He poured out Himself to death, and was numbered with the transgressors; yet He Himself bore the sin of many, and interceded for the transgressors.

God has always been and will always be merciful, gracious, and forgiving.

Paul the Poke

Habakkuk 1:5 Look among the nations, and see; wonder and be astounded. For I am doing a work in your days that you would not believe if told. -LORD God

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