Archive for pregnant

The Gift of Life… Christine McDonald

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , , , on July 17, 2020 by paulthepoke

Then I went into labor. I remember them shackling my ankles to the bed in the delivery room, and the nurse asking, “Do you guys really have to do that?”

The officer said, “She’s ours until that baby comes out and we get the stool sample from the baby to see if it’s positive for cocaine.”

The guard from the county who was with me knew me from my many times in and out of the county jail. While I was in labor she asked me, “So what are you going to do after the baby arrives?”

I said, “I’m homeless. You know I can’t care for a child.” Besides, I was not aware of services.

Sadly, as I look back over my experiences in the years thereafter, I realize that if you aren’t aware of what services you need, they aren’t always offered up freely. So, teaching individuals how to be their own self–advocates is vital. I didn’t even understand that there were services for me to ask for. Who knows if I would have been considered for any of them if I had asked? Regardless, the professionals in contexts like hospitals and courts should freely provide information of suitable services for hurting individuals. This is their right, no matter how far gone they are and no matter how long their brokenness has existed in their life. Everyone should be given enough information to make choices to have help or not. Everyone deserves a fighting chance.

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The big baby arrived at last: 9 pounds, 8 ounces. “It’s a girl,” they said.

The doctor said, “Hey, can you take off these shackles? She’s not getting up for a while.”

The guard complied, and then she moved to the other side of the room, close to the door. She picked up the phone and called the judge, then handed the phone to me. The judge said, “Well, honey, the baby is a good, healthy size. I’ll be in touch again when the stool sample comes back.”

After I was cleaned up and showered, I was shackled to the bed again. The baby was in my room. I remember holding her and smelling her.

“You got family?” the nurse asked.

“Not around here,” I answered.

It took some 36 hours for the poop test to be done. There was also a huge amount of paperwork to be taken care of, so I was in the hospital for about two and a half days after the baby was born.

For two and a half days, that little baby shared a hospital room with me, gripping my finger and sleeping on my chest. The nurses would wake me and suggest I place her in her bassinet, but every time I said, “Not yet.” The baby was so warm and smelled so sweet. I shed tears when I spoke to her while I fed her.

To be continued…

Contact Information:
Christine C. McDonald
636-487-8986
Christine.CryPurple@gmail.com

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

https://crypurplemovie.com/

Have A Nice Rest… Christine McDonald

Posted in #PaulthePoke, Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , , , on July 11, 2020 by paulthepoke

In the mornings I was throwing up, in the afternoons I was throwing up, and in the evenings I was throwing up. I’d try to eat, and would just throw up. I was picked up by the police a few weeks later in a sting operation. By this point I was almost five months along.

When I went to court, they didn’t have enough on me to keep me or convict me, because I hadn’t taken the money or even negotiated the price for my services. Plus, the officers had not shown up in court to assist in the prosecution. So the charges were dropped.

However, the judge told me, “You won’t be released.”
“What do you mean?” I asked.
He explained that I was being held without charges, but the baby I was carrying was being protected from me. I would remain in custody until the birth of the baby.
“You can’t do that,” I said. “You can’t hold me without charges.”
“Lady, I just did,” was his answer.

I had been in jail for about two weeks before I went to court. They had confirmed I was pregnant, given me double meal trays and vitamins, and sent me to a prenatal appointment at the local hospital.

I see now they were holding me for that court date, collecting information and waiting for me to reach five months. At five months, the fetus is considered a human life and not just a fetus. The baby is considered viable and has a chance at life if born that early. Taking the baby into custody as they did was the best thing they could have done for me or her.

The judge informed the county officers that he was to be notified when I went into labor and again at the time of delivery. Then he said, “Ms. McDonald, at the time of delivery you’ll be free to go if the baby is tested and found to be drug free. But if the baby tests positive for drugs, I promise you that the state will bring charges against you for child endangerment and any other charges I can come up with, and I will encourage maximum sentencing and full prosecution.” Then he looked at me with a smile and said, “You have a nice rest.”

While I was locked up, I was not offered any social services. I just stayed in a cell alone, waiting and waiting. That was in late 2000. I had the baby in March 2001. I remember getting double trays at mealtime to ensure the
baby grew.

I remember drinking gallons of water, too. Following my own mindless logic, I was trying to flush the drugs from the baby’s system.

To be continued…

Contact Information:
Christine C. McDonald
636-487-8986
Christine.CryPurple@gmail.com

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

https://crypurplemovie.com/

God’s Blessing in His Time… Christine McDonald

Posted in #PaulthePoke, Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , on July 3, 2020 by paulthepoke

I’ll share with you a story that shows us how God loves us, how He blesses us in spite of our past mistakes. He always blesses in His timing, and, just as He sometimes answers prayers differently than we may ask. His blessings may not be what we expect, either. We don’t always know what’s best for us.

He knows all. He knows the whole story of our lives. He knows the perfect answer, the perfect blessing, and the perfect time. He is faithful!

I remember being really tired, much more than usual. No matter what I did or how much I slept, I was so tired, just wanting to sleep. I had done drugs for years, but now I found myself crawling under the tables in laundromats at night to just sleep. What was going on with me?

I had been picked up on a ticket and had gone to the city jail. I remember falling to the ground in the police station as they asked me to stand against the wall until my name was called for me to be booked in. I was taken to the emergency room, where they discovered I was dehydrated and severely underweight.

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They came in later and told me I was pregnant. Really? I remember asking, “What did you just say?” They repeated those three life–changing words: “You are pregnant.” I responded, “I can’t be pregnant.” The emergency room professional seemed to be holding back a smirk, replying, “Well, Ms. McDonald, you are a prostitute. Don’t you know how the whole pregnancy thing works?”

I said, rather hatefully, I might add, “I know how it works. I am a prostitute and that is why I cannot be pregnant. How far along am I?”

They told me I was so underweight that it would be hard to tell, but they ordered an ultrasound. They brought me sandwiches and some Sprite, and I waited.

Oh, my gosh, I was thinking, this can’t be real! God only knows who the father is. I sure didn’t have a clue. I’m living in a park, sleeping in empty, abandoned buildings. I can’t be a mother! I didn’t even know what year or month it was.

After the ultrasound, they returned. “We think you’re about 12 to 14 weeks along, but it’s hard to tell.”

At least three months pregnant? Are you kidding me? The jeans I had on were a size zero, and I needed a belt to hold them up.

I was returned to the city jail. I believe I did 10 days, and then I was released. I still reflect back to that time in the emergency room, a place that was not unfamiliar to me. Why didn’t they send a social worker at that time, to offer some services? I believe it was because I was a known homeless prostitute who also suffered with the disease of addiction. I mean, I have worked with a lot of individuals over the years, and the ER staff generally asks if the patient wants to speak to a social worker. Is that because I’m present, so it appears that someone cares for them? Or is it because we have become more understanding of human trafficking and the darkness and many facets of prostituted persons’ lives? I’m not sure…

To be continued…

Contact Information:
Christine C. McDonald
636-487-8986
Christine.CryPurple@gmail.com

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

https://crypurplemovie.com/

Paul the Poke

Habakkuk 1:5 Look among the nations, and see; wonder and be astounded. For I am doing a work in your days that you would not believe if told. -LORD God

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