Archive for the Jude Category

Jude: Love

Posted in Jude with tags , , , , , on October 28, 2018 by paulthepoke

Jude 1:2 May mercy, peace, and love be multiplied to you.

This is the second time the word αγαπαο/agapao or “love” is used by Jude. For what it’s worth, scholars argue whether the term is used three or four times by Jude.

This is αγαπαο/agapao. This is God’s “love” for us. Defined as love, affection, good will, benevolence, to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly. This love is the nature of God.

Get the flutter out of your stomach and the tingle out of your senses. This love is purposeful with selection. God chooses us despite our issues.

God is love. He is αγαπαο/agapao.

1 John 4:8 Anyone who does not love does not know God, because God is love.

1 John 4:16 And we have come to know and believe the love that God has for us. God is love; whoever abides in love abides in God, and God in him.

God demonstrated His αγαπαο/agapao for broken humanity by sending His Son.

John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life.

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In response to God’s love, we are called to αγαπαο/agapao. We are called to love with all of our being and all that we have to offer; heart, soul, mind, and strength. In the verses below from Mark 12, the original language communicates this love is a future action. Jesus is telling us how and who to love.

Which begs the questions, do we put God first in our lives? Order matters to Jesus. He put God above others. Have we made personal sacrifices for God? Do we love God with intensity and passion? Do we sacrifice ourselves on behalf of others? Do we love our neighbors with the same gusto as we love ourselves?

Mark 12:29-31 Jesus answered, “The most important is, Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. There is no other commandment greater than these.”

 

Jude places the focus on the concepts of mercy and peace and love. May these ideals be multiplied and lavished. May an abundance be heaped upon you, the believer in Jesus Christ.

 

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Jude: Peace

Posted in Jude with tags , , , , , , , on October 21, 2018 by paulthepoke

Jude 1:2 May mercy, peace, and love be multiplied to you.

Peace or εἰρήνη/eiréné in the original Greek…

Strong’s Concordance defines the word as: a state of national tranquility; exemption from the rage and havoc of war.

peace between individuals, that is harmony, concord, security, safety, prosperity, felicity.

of the Messiah’s peace; the way that leads to peace through salvation; of Christianity, the tranquil state of a soul assured of its salvation through Christ, and so fearing nothing from God and content with its earthly lot; the blessed state of devout and upright men after death.

The term εἰρήνη/eiréné is used 92 times in the New Testament. The Apostle Paul frequently introduced readers of his epistles with a greeting of peace. Below are a couple of examples.

Romans 1:7 To all those in Rome who are loved by God and called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.

1 Corinthians 1:3 Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.

The same greeting of peace is noted in the letters of 2 Corinthians, Ephesians, Galatians, Philippians, Colossians, twice to the Thessalonians, Titus, Philemon, and both books of Timothy. Paul makes this point repeatedly as an introduction in his epistles. God (Father, Son, and Spirit) is the source of our peace.

As believers in Christ, we are called to be at peace with others. Seek peace with your fellow man. Do your part. There is nothing one can do about another’s attitudes, beliefs, lifestyle, words, and actions. We are not going to get along with everyone. But as for the individual believer, pursue peace in relationships.

Romans 12:18 If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men.

Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.

 

Jewish people will use “peace” as a greeting or farewell to others. The term is “shalom” in the Hebrew.

Per Strong’s, shalom is defined as: completeness, soundness, welfare, peace, safety, health, prosperity, quiet, tranquility, contentment, friendship; of human relationships and with God especially in covenant relationship.

Shalom is used 237 times in the Old Testament.

The first time “peace” or “shalom” is used in the Bible is in Genesis 15:15. God was revealing His covenant to Abram regarding his descendants and their future. Part of God’s promise is peace. Abram was in a deep slumber. God was communicating to him in what many might consider a nightmare. The specific reference to Abram was with his future death and burial. God, the author of peace, revealed the concept to humanity in darkness, slavery, oppression, terror, death, and fear. This is how God chose to introduce “peace”.

Genesis 15:15 As for you, you shall go to your fathers in peace; you will be buried at a good old age.

 

dove gracePeace is like a military guard. Peace crushes rebellions and it protects hearts and minds. Jesus is the answer, embodiment, and fulfillment of peace. In the end, peace wins.

Romans 16:20 The God of peace will soon crush Satan under your feet. The grace of our Lord Jesus be with you.

Philippians 4:7 And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

 

Jude: Mercy

Posted in Jude with tags , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2018 by paulthepoke

Jude 1:2 May mercy and peace and love be multiplied to you.

The Greek word for mercy is ἔλεος/eleos. It is defined as pity or compassion. Mercy is being excused from a deserved punishment or outcome. HELPS Word-studies states it is God’s loyalty to His covenant. The word is used 27 times in the New Testament.

Per Strong’s Concordance, mercy defined: kindness or good will towards the miserable and the afflicted, joined with a desire to help them;

of men towards men: to exercise the virtue of mercy, show one’s self merciful;

of God towards men: in general providence; the mercy and clemency of God in providing and offering to men salvation by Christ;

the mercy of Christ, whereby at His return to judgment He will bless true Christians with eternal life.

Eleos is defined as “compassion” in some cases. For example…

Matthew 9:13 Go and learn what this means: ‘I desire compassion/mercy, and not sacrifice.’ For I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” -Jesus

These are the words of Jesus in Matthew. He is quoting Hosea 6:6. The issue is one’s mental attitude, focus, and heart towards God. The Lord wants our hearts, not acts of religion.

Hosea 6:6 For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings.

 

The first time “mercy” is used in the Bible is in Genesis 19:16. The context is Lot’s family and Sodom and Gomorrah. God’s action towards Lot and his daughters is “merciful”. Notice, Lot and his daughters were spared from the judgment of Sodom and Gomorrah. Lot’s wife was extended mercy and she ultimately rejected mercy. Judgment, she became a pillar of salt. It does not matter if one is extended mercy. What are you as an individual going to do with mercy that has been extended to you?

Genesis 19:16 But he lingered. So the men seized him and his wife and his two daughters by the hand, the LORD being merciful to him, and they brought him out and set him outside the city.

This is the Hebrew word chemlah. It means pity or compassion just as the Greek word ἔλεος/eleos. Chemlah comes from the Hebrew word chamal which means to spare. The word implies we are responsible. Justice demands judgment. If a transgression is noted, punishment is indicated. The wage of sin is death. But, God is merciful.

Chemlah is used one other time in the Old Testament prophet of Isaiah. God is a God of mercy, even in the Old Testament. In the verse below chemlah is translated as pity.

Isaiah 63:9 In all their affliction he was afflicted, and the angel of his presence saved them; in his love and in his pity he redeemed them; he lifted them up and carried them all the days of old.

At the time of Isaiah’s writing, the verse above had prophetic implications toward the future work of Jesus Christ. Hindsight being 20/20 in the 21st century, we know this is talking about Jesus.

Afflicted… Who took affliction on behalf of an afflicted people?

…the angel of his presence… literally means “messenger of faces”. This messenger “saved” or yasha in the Hebrew. Yasha means to deliver or save from moral trouble. This is the verb form of the root word. The noun form of the word is “Yeshua”. Jesus is the English translation of Yeshua. Jesus delivers His people. Yeshua yasha…

Mercy is available. There is time now. God is merciful…

Ephesians 2:4 But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which He loved us…

 

 

 

Jude: Called, Loved, & Kept

Posted in Jude, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on October 9, 2018 by paulthepoke

Jude 1:1b To those who are called, beloved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ:

…those who are called… In the original Greek, the word for “those” is the definite article τοῖς. It is the plural form of what would be translated as “the”. Definite articles are a big deal in the Greek language. The koine Greek of the New Testament has no indefinite articles like we do in English. There are no “a” or “an” in the language. A definite article is a point of emphasis.

God the Father describes “those” as called or κλετοσ/kletos. The idea is called, invited (to a banquet); invited (by God in the proclamation of the Gospel) to obtain eternal salvation in the kingdom through Christ; called to (the discharge of) some office; divinely selected and appointed.

Everybody is ultimately invited to the call of Jesus Christ. Salvation is for all of humanity.

1 Timothy 2:3-4 This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.

1 Peter 3:18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit…

…beloved… “Those” are “loved”. This is αγαπαο/agapao. This is God’s love for us. Defined as love, affection, good will, benevolence, to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly. This love is the nature of God.

The concept is God has loved us from the past and His love will never end. His love for us is eternal. It is God who has shown us what love is and how to love.

John 13:34 A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

 

…in God the Father… The verse states “those” are “in” God positionally. As believers in Jesus, this is our place. We are in the body of Christ. Believers are sealed with the Spirit. Jude states we are fixed in the Father. This position is confirmed by John as well as others.

John 10:28-29 I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand.

 

and kept for Jesus Christ: The Father has looked upon “those” and τερεο/tereo or “kept”. Tereo means: to attend to carefully, take care of or to guard. Metaphorically to keep, one in the state in which he is; to observe or to reserve: to undergo something.

The point is God has always “kept” us and He will continue to “keep” us. The Father does not change in the way He views us.

We are “kept” for Jesus Christ. The language is vague. But is there an implication something is coming to “those”???

1 Corinthians 15:52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed.

 

Definitions provided by Strong’s Concordance.

 

 

Jude, A Slave

Posted in Jude with tags , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2018 by paulthepoke

JudeAnthonyVanDyckJude 1:1 Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James…

Who is Jude? Iουδασ/Judas… His name means “he shall be praised”. His name is Judah in the Hebrew means “praise Yahweh”.

Members of the synagogue in Nazareth identify Judas as Christ’s half-brother. They also proclaim James and Judas (Jude) are brothers. Mary is the mother of Jesus, James, and Jude. Joseph is the father of James and Jude. God is the Father of Jesus.

Matthew 13:55 Is not this the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother called Mary? And are not his brothers James and Joseph and Simon and Judas?

Mark 6:3 Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon?

The Apostle Paul testifies James is Jesus’ brother.

Galatians 1:19 But I saw none of the other apostles except James the Lord’s brother.

And James and Judas are brothers, therefore, Judas and Jesus are half-brothers.

James and Jude grew up with Jesus. They lived with Christ in the same house under the same parents and siblings. His brothers had seen miracles. Water was turned into wine. Thousands were fed. Christ had walked on water. Yet…

John 7:5 For not even His own brothers believed in Him.

The unbelief in Jesus was before His death, burial, and resurrection. Hearts and attitudes would change after the fact of the ascension of Christ.

Acts 1:14 All these with one accord were devoting themselves to prayer, together with the women and Mary the mother of Jesus, and his brothers.

…a servant of Jesus Christ…

As of the writing of the epistle, Jude considered himself a bond servant or δουλοσ/doulos in the Greek. The word is frequently translated as “servant” or “bond servant”. Notice, Jude does not associate himself as a half-brother to Jesus. He refers to himself as a servant.

Strong’s Concordance defines δουλοσ/doulos as: a slave, bondman, man of servile condition; metaphorically, one who gives himself up to another’s will; those whose service is used by Christ in extending and advancing his cause among men; devoted to another to the disregard of one’s own interests.

As believers in Jesus, we were purchased by His shed blood. He loves us. He owns us. We are redeemed.

Ephesians 1:7 In Him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace…

1 Corinthians 6:19-20 Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body.

PaulthePoke

Prophecy Watch & Bible Study

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