Archive for compassion

Recovering Compassion

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald with tags , , , , , , on November 2, 2018 by paulthepoke

Psalm 25:6 Remember, O LORD, Your compassion and Your lovingkindnesses, for they have been from of old.

Psalm 145:9 The LORD is good to all, and His mercies are over all His works.

Daniel 9:9 To the Lord our God belong compassion and forgiveness, for we have rebelled against Him…

 

“I have been a part of fighting demand since 2007,” Christine Clarity McDonald.

See Christine in this featured story by Fox 4 News in Kansas City, MO. Video provided in the story that aired on television.

https://fox4kc.com/2018/10/29/kansas-leaders-join-growing-number-of-states-working-to-go-after-sex-buyers/

Christine McDonald

Our compassion should be guided by God’s compassion, not dependent on age or gender or how a person got in their situation in the first place. After all, when we engage with these individuals who are over 18 and learn how they entered the world of commercial sexual exploitation, we find that more often than not their victimization began as a child. Why then do we have such a hard time viewing adults as victims and worthy of our love when they are recovered or reach out for services?

It is because we, the outsiders, looking in with our judgments and our continued labels, have built these barriers. These barriers, coupled with the existing internal challenges these individuals face, stand in the way of their chance to soar and flourish into the creatures that our Creator has designed them to be.

compassion

I could go on here, but the point is simple: The hurt caused by trauma is the very same to the prostituted individual as it is to the homeless person, or to the individual suffering from mental illness, or the college student, or the elderly lady down the street, or the professional, or the fellow church members. We must recover compassion.

“Love your neighbor, all of ’em.” -Christine Clarity McDonald

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Jude: Mercy

Posted in Jude with tags , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2018 by paulthepoke

Jude 1:2 May mercy and peace and love be multiplied to you.

The Greek word for mercy is ἔλεος/eleos. It is defined as pity or compassion. Mercy is being excused from a deserved punishment or outcome. HELPS Word-studies states it is God’s loyalty to His covenant. The word is used 27 times in the New Testament.

Per Strong’s Concordance, mercy defined: kindness or good will towards the miserable and the afflicted, joined with a desire to help them;

of men towards men: to exercise the virtue of mercy, show one’s self merciful;

of God towards men: in general providence; the mercy and clemency of God in providing and offering to men salvation by Christ;

the mercy of Christ, whereby at His return to judgment He will bless true Christians with eternal life.

Eleos is defined as “compassion” in some cases. For example…

Matthew 9:13 Go and learn what this means: ‘I desire compassion/mercy, and not sacrifice.’ For I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” -Jesus

These are the words of Jesus in Matthew. He is quoting Hosea 6:6. The issue is one’s mental attitude, focus, and heart towards God. The Lord wants our hearts, not acts of religion.

Hosea 6:6 For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings.

 

The first time “mercy” is used in the Bible is in Genesis 19:16. The context is Lot’s family and Sodom and Gomorrah. God’s action towards Lot and his daughters is “merciful”. Notice, Lot and his daughters were spared from the judgment of Sodom and Gomorrah. Lot’s wife was extended mercy and she ultimately rejected mercy. Judgment, she became a pillar of salt. It does not matter if one is extended mercy. What are you as an individual going to do with mercy that has been extended to you?

Genesis 19:16 But he lingered. So the men seized him and his wife and his two daughters by the hand, the LORD being merciful to him, and they brought him out and set him outside the city.

This is the Hebrew word chemlah. It means pity or compassion just as the Greek word ἔλεος/eleos. Chemlah comes from the Hebrew word chamal which means to spare. The word implies we are responsible. Justice demands judgment. If a transgression is noted, punishment is indicated. The wage of sin is death. But, God is merciful.

Chemlah is used one other time in the Old Testament prophet of Isaiah. God is a God of mercy, even in the Old Testament. In the verse below chemlah is translated as pity.

Isaiah 63:9 In all their affliction he was afflicted, and the angel of his presence saved them; in his love and in his pity he redeemed them; he lifted them up and carried them all the days of old.

At the time of Isaiah’s writing, the verse above had prophetic implications toward the future work of Jesus Christ. Hindsight being 20/20 in the 21st century, we know this is talking about Jesus.

Afflicted… Who took affliction on behalf of an afflicted people?

…the angel of his presence… literally means “messenger of faces”. This messenger “saved” or yasha in the Hebrew. Yasha means to deliver or save from moral trouble. This is the verb form of the root word. The noun form of the word is “Yeshua”. Jesus is the English translation of Yeshua. Jesus delivers His people. Yeshua yasha…

Mercy is available. There is time now. God is merciful…

Ephesians 2:4 But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which He loved us…

 

 

 

Collateral Damage

Posted in Christine "Clarity" McDonald, Culture with tags , , , , , , , on July 6, 2018 by paulthepoke

Christine McDonaldFeaturing Christine “Clarity” McDonald

Christine is appointed by the Missouri Attorney General for the Trafficking Task Force.

“For every woman and girl violently attacked, we reduce our humanity. For every woman forced into unprotected sex because men demand this, we destroy dignity and pride. Every woman who has to sell her life for sex we condemn to a lifetime in prison. For every moment we remain silent, we conspire against our women. For every woman infected by HIV, we destroy a generation.” – Nelson Mandela

Collateral damage is what we call the loss, injury or victims incurred by an action or event who were never intended to be involved. Many times, when we venture out in a helping capacity, we have our sights squarely focused on the population we serve. Yet oftentimes, those individuals we serve touch the lives of many we may never encounter.

Compassion and love at their best grow and extend indefinitely. The things we do out of love for others can have a massive ripple effect across time and space. Likewise, the things we don’t do can carry greater, far-reaching ramifications. What if one simple, yet sometimes controversial, moment of service could save a life? Conversely, what if a misapplied moral objection costs a life?

When we consider human trafficking, exploitation, and prostitution, we tend to recognize the purchaser/exploiter as well as the person being used. However, there is another population that is inadvertently affected yet rarely lands on our radar. Sometimes our narrow view of the impact and our tightly-clung-to moral objections have unintended consequences.

human trafficking

When we think of serving and how we serve, the most important thing we can do is put on the love of Christ and remember how much He loves and would give all for just one person. We have to ask ourselves, is making a moral statement that will inevitably be lost more important than the individual?

Jesus was well known in His day for spending His time with those viewed as the biggest “sinners.” When the religious leaders of the day verbally lashed against Him for this, He told a parable about a shepherd who had one hundred beloved sheep and one ran away. In the parable, the shepherd left the 99 to go after the one. The Son of God did not withhold His presence from the “sinners” to make a moral statement. Instead, He left us all with a clear example to follow. He made it crystal clear that every one of those “sinners” was invaluable to Him.

Even while knowing His days were limited, Jesus didn’t spend His time with His family and loved ones. Instead He chose to spend time among the untouchables of His day. And though He – the perfect, Holy, God of the universe – had many moral objections to their actions, He didn’t let those moral objections become the focus or stand in the way of an opportunity to touch their hearts.

“Love your neighbor… ALL of ’em!” -Christine “Clarity” McDonald

 

 

PaulthePoke

Prophecy Watch & Bible Study

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